What Goes on During a Septic Tank Pumping?

Metro Septic Pumping TruckIf your home uses a septic system, you know that your biggest responsibility is to have your septic tank pumped on a routine basis. Depending on the size of your tank and number of occupants in your house, this is often every 3 to 5 years. Unless you are a state certified contractor with experience in septic plumbing, this is not a DIY job. But it does require that you contact your trusted septic services company and schedule the pumping appointment.

Thanks to modern technology, the septic pumping process is quicker, more sanitary and less disturbing to homeowners than it ever has been. While it is not imperative that you know exactly what goes on during this septic maintenance job, a better understanding can help you appreciate the task and remember to schedule it when the time comes.

How Does Septic Pumping Work?

Your septic service team will arrive with special equipment, such as a vacuum truck for sucking out the gallons of liquid sludge and wastes from your tank. You may also see the professionals use a spatula-shaped tool that can be used to manually break apart solid waste in the tank.

Once the tank lid is located, uncovered and opened, the vacuum pump is inserted down into the tank to gradually empty its contents. This can take as quick as 15 minutes or as long as an hour. Once the tank is empty, the outlet effluent filters will be thoroughly cleaned using a hose and/or special cleaning tools. Outlet effluent filters are what connect your tank to your drainfield and they are important because they keep solid waste from entering your drainfield. At the completion of your septic pumping, the vacuum truck will exit your property where it will properly dispose of your tank’s contents in a non-hazardous and state-approved location.

As you can see the process is very straightforward, fairly quick and incredibly important to the health and longevity of your septic system. If you are unsure about how often your septic tank should be pumped or if you notice signs of a full tank (foul odor, water pooling in drainfield, clogged drains), please call Metro Septic today.

Posted on Behalf of Metro Septic and Plumbing

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